Quebec City – On You Trump

“Kristallnacht,” the “Night of Broken Glass,” because the streets were covered with broken glass from all the Jewish windows.

Mind You

By Dr David Laing Dawson

Mr. Trump, this is on you.

Every country in the world has a few young men capable of committing a mass murder. They are angry; they blame others for their failures; they nurse grudges; they are easily caught up in conspiracies; they rebel against any authority; they lap up the hatred of others; they spend much of their time lamenting about the state of the world while drinking beer or snorting cocaine late into the night; they are unsuccessful with women. They deeply fear the world of adult responsibility. They play first person shooter video games. They like guns. They harbor racist grievances. Some are “loners” as the newspaper will call them, but this usually means a mental disorder that limits their ability to engage face to face with others, and allows them to build a delusional world view from other sources. Of course the…

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When did the Catholic school teacher ban occur? Never.

First they came for the teachers

Reclaim Reform

American children in Catholic schools were traditionally taught by nuns, nuns who took a sacred vow of obedience to the Roman Catholic Church and the Pope in the Vatican in Rome. American Catholic school teachers were by-and-large nuns.

nuns-during-wwii-in-usa-002

During WWII against the Axis Powers of Germany, Italy and Japan, the years of deadly battle created incredible and long lasting animosities against these enemies. In America, Italian and German stores and restaurants were burned as many police authorities turned a blind eye to the assailants; Japanese-Americans were interred (detained and robbed of their properties and livelihood) as American authorities invaded, searched and plundered many of their homes and workplaces.

The Roman Catholic nuns, who dressed as many Muslim women today dress, were not “detained” or searched. Their garb was a point of open ridicule by Klan members in a few parts of America, but American authorities did not ban or threaten…

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The size of the equipment

The Donald continues to compensate with the bigliest camera size and lense. This is the best!

Sesquiotica

This article isn’t about words. Sorry! I couldn’t come up with a word-based excuse for it. It’s about cameras, but it’s about something you don’t need to be an insider to appreciate. Because it’s about the size of the equipment, and how much it means to some people.

Recently, the photo news site PetaPixel published an article about Donald Trump’s presidential portrait. They weren’t focusing on how the picture looked – though there are things that could be said about that. They were talking about the equipment used to take the picture. You can get this information from the digital file. The camera records it and anyone with the right software can see for themselves.

The thing that seemed amusing at first look was that the camera used is one that was released in 2007 and is no longer being made. It’s out of date in its technical specs. Why not…

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lackadaisical

Alas! Even the power of a word diminishes in the United States.

Sesquiotica

By my desk, I have a page-a-day calendar. In my email I get a few word-a-day emails (in several different languages, since of course I know all the words in English 😛 ). And on Twitter, I get my lack-a-day: what’s gone missing now? Ah well, so it goes.

Not to be lackadaisical about it, but yeah. When you see a lack, and you lament it, you can say “Ah, lack!” as you might say “Ah, loss!” to a loss. Or, to go with alas for a loss, you say alack for a lack. That’s where it comes from.

But it has grown past that. Once it became a one-word exclamation, it was also available to swap in for woe or pity, or, of course, alas. You could say “woe to the day” or “pity the day” or “alas for the day,” but you could also say –…

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Baby Steps

This blog touched me. You followed much of my journey. My chant was, “Hell, no, we won’t go!” That was during the Vietnam War days.

Life seems full of indecent dilemmas: starve or feed the system. Most of my family still has to play. My brother gets his paycheck from Nestle. My sister has a conservative job to pay for her family’s sustenance.

My father, a very just thinker and writer, worked as a technical writer specializing in sonar systems for the Navy.

I am retired and don’t feel that I have anything to lose. I am dangerous. I have a sharp pen and a sharp mouth. I love using both of them. My friend, we are kindred spirits and cannot stir others until our passion for justice bursts from within us.

Looking to others for “trolls in the mist” seems counter-intuitive to me. I must look into myself and make sure I am never disappointed.

This is not over. This will never be over. I hope you stay in it with me, because I won’t be around that much longer. Inspire our wise youth. They will carry the flag.

CrossKnit

The first time I marched, it was autumn. I remember sitting very still, cross-legged, on the basketball court, chanting HELL NO, WE WON’T GO, WE WON’T FIGHT FOR TEXACO. 

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earth

The earth will remain long after profit poisons it! Somehow, that consoles me. Perhaps a different beginning?

Sesquiotica

Earth. The soil, the ground, the surface, the orb of the planet, the world, the full expanse of our being, the people and places of it. All the worth, all the mirth, all that has a birth or a berth, every heart and every hearth, every dear and every dearth and every death, and every tongue and hand and eye and ear: earthlings all, all on the earth, of the earth. Compassed in this short word for the soil that holds us together, five letters but (for most speakers) only two sounds: a sustaining liquid /ɹ/ and a soft dusty fricative /θ/.

Liquid and dust. Water and soil. This is the surface of the earth. But it is also two of the four “elements”: earth, air, fire, water. A heuristic way of conceptualizing, but of course three of those things contain many elements and the other is a process that…

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asperity

I learned a new (old) useful word today.

Sesquiotica

It is a season of much asperity.

Yes, there is, as Samuel Johnson wrote in The Rambler, “The nakedness and asperity of the wintry world.” But there is also, as he wrote another time in the same periodical, much “Quickness of resentment and asperity of reply” – if not in our personal daily lives, then certainly in the larger world. (Thanks to the OED for the quotes.) As we traipse through the precipitation, we could aspire to something much more auspicious: prosperity, sincerity, perhaps a party (or parties). Something to leave a better taste in the mouth.

Taste? To me, asperity has a clear taste, and that taste is the taste of Aspirin. Have you every chewed an Aspirin? It is acetylsalycylic acid, and as such is as sour as ascorbic or acetic acid (vitamin C or vinegar), but since Aspirin also contains cornstarch, hypromellose, powdered cellulose, and triacetin…

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